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Tuesday, 25 November 2014

Freeze Your Nuts Off Ride 2014


Last year I organized the Freeze Your Nuts Off Ride. It is the last group ride of the year before most people store their bikes for the season. This year I just never had the time, so Tom Vihvelin stepped up and took the reins. The weather gods cursed us this year and the ride was postponed twice, and finally went ahead last Sunday in freezing temps. I unfortunately had to work and missed the ride. To make matters worst we received a dusting of snow and ice the morning of the ride, but luckily it melted early enough for the three brave souls to get out.

Here is Tom's account of the day

FYNOR 2014 Ride Report (November 23, 2014)

Only three brave (foolish?) riders turned up for FYNOR 2014.  We had unexpected icing conditions overnight that was cause for concern this morning and resulted in us delaying our departure by an hour.  However by 11 AM the ice had melted and nobody experienced any loss of traction despite moments of trepidation when crossing shiny, dark spots on the side roads.

Our hats are off to Steve M. who drove his Yamaha Super Tenere all the way from Shediac just to ride FYNOR 2014!  I think Steve must have hit the road around 7:30 AM to get here in time.  The weather was even worse in Shediac this morning.

Total trip distance for Peter and me was 331 kms but I figure Steve put on almost 700 kms since he rode down and back home to Shediac


We departed the Irving in Saint John at 11 AM and followed the coastal route, enjoying the scenic fishing villages along the way and watching the big breakers that were crashing on the rocks with spray almost reaching the road. We stopped and had some delicious cherry cheesecake and coffee in Pennfield and then headed north up the 785.  This was new territory for all of us and it’s a great road.  No problem doing 110 kph on this road.

At the intersection of 785 and 101 we went north all the way up to New Maryland and then jumped on the TCH to the Gagetown exit where we said bye to Steve.  By this time the sun was getting low on the horizon and the temperature was dipping so we tucked in and tried to make time on the old river road through Gagetown all the way to Grand Bay-Westfield.  This got tricky however as many parts of the road were very wet and with the temperature falling, we had to be extra careful.  By the time we made it all the way through to Grand Bay-Westfield we decided to race the sundown home and jumped onto route 7 for a quick, dry-road run back home.  We got back around 4:15 PM.

All in all it was a great ride with what turned out to be pretty good weather considering that it is late November.  Despite temperatures that hovered at +2 to +4 all day (with a temporary spike to +8) nobody got cold thanks to dressing in multiple layers.  Peter and I both felt and looked like the Michelin Man with all our layers.  Steve with his electric suit was a much slimmer looking rider.
 
With sun and blue skies for most of the day coupled with scenery that ranged from ocean vistas to picturesque farmlands and the serene waters of the Saint John River it was a fitting way to end this year’s riding season.

I have attached a few photos and here is link to our route if anyone wants to take a gander at it.  https://goo.gl/maps/9rHCR

The only question that remains is; “Who will step up and organize next year’s FYNOR?”

Cheers,
Tom





The Maritime Off Road Adventure Ride Documentary or Whatever Editor 'Arris is Gonna Call It

A few weeks ago Canada Moto Guide's mighty editor-at-large (he is six foot four) sent me a link to this video with an idea of doing something similar. It's a great video so I encourage you to watch it. It's endorsed by the ever famous Austin Vince of Mondo Enduro.




What first started out as a Moncton to Montreal route, soon changed to a loop style route throughout New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. The routing will be big bike rideable, and we will basically start in either Moncton or Saint John, head towards St. Stephen area and then north towards Edmundston before turning east for Bathurst or Miramichi then into Nova Scotia and down towards Digby and Yarmouth, and riding the ferry back to Saint John.

Being the lazy sods that we are, there is no way that we are going to even try and map that out on our own, so we are going to enlist the help of local riders along the way to guide us through their favourite trails, dirt roads, etc, taking pavement as little as possible. Similar to the video above, except the only one with an English accent will be 'Arris, and myself quoting Monty Python skits the odd time or two.

The best part.........we are going to film this for another Bigland documentary, so you will have another two-wheeled adventure to watch over next years cold, snowy, dreadful winter.

Right now the tentative plan is ride this in July sometime, I have to work out dates that coincide with my vacation ( I get an extra week this year, woohoo) and juggle family vacation time. We can't leave it too late in the year as it will start to interfere with Fundy Adventure Rally, which 'Arris becomes quite busy with.

Not sure what 'Arris will be riding, maybe a long-term test bike, or the ol' KLR, I'll be on the rally build CRF250L, this being the first big test for that bike.

If anyone wants to help out in routing us through the Maritimes, or would like to show us around their local riding area, give us a place to sleep, provide us with food, beer, gas, etc drop me a note, and we'll make sure you make it into the video and be guaranteed your fifteen seconds of fame. Or is that fifteen minutes? Whatever, I'll flash your mug across the screen.


Wednesday, 19 November 2014

Ural I Want is a Triumphant Hack



Well except for the people living on the west coast, most Canadian riders have their bikes put away for the winter. So not many of you are riding anymore. I never really store my bike, any opportunity to ride over the winter I will take. Like today, high of 0C, and the rain has washed the salt off the road again, so I'll warm up the bike, plug in the heated jacket and head out for a spin. Extended forecast calls for 10C on Tuesday. Woohoo. El Nino, where have you been the last couple of years? Good to have you back my ol' friend.

Sidecars.......yes I want one, a Ural would be very nice. A 2015 Gear-Up would be the ideal choice, however I have come to the realization that good used ones are hard to find, and a new one is just not in the cards financially at the moment. $21K tax in! Ouch.

Yesterday, I began searching for a retro-style bike that I can have a sidecar attached to for a reasonable amount of money. The ol' Vstrom was $9000, because a subframe had to be fabricated.
I love the Harley Sportster Iron 883, and the Yamaha Bolt, but those are street bikes only, so they really don't fit the bill. I need to simplify my life not complicate it more with multiple bikes. (Ok that last part is a lie, I'd really have a garage full of bikes if I could) Then I came across this picture and I had my ah ha moment.


A Triumph Scrambler. A very cool bike, almost too cool for me, because this guy rode one and he is the King of Cool.




"What about the Ducati Scrambler you lusted about?" You ask. Well, I do love the Duc, and if it wasn't for my sidecar obsession I'd definitely be leaning towards the Italian side. The problem with the Duc is, the engine is not cradled in a frame like the Triumph, which makes installing a hack (sidecar) impossible without fabricating a subframe, like my current situation with the Strom. 



The one bonus I do see over the Ural in this situation besides price, is.......the sidecar on the Scrambler can easily be removed. Only four attachment bolts. So if I was going off on the CMG/Bigland Off Road Maritime Discovery Route documentary ride I could disconnect the hack and go. Going to ride with the dogs for the weekend, install and I have some K9 company.

How could you not want to take these two beauties for a ride? Retro cool bike, two cute dogs in a sidecar, I'll beating the women away with a stick.


See how the Scrambler attracts them, even without the dogs.



The other thing I really like about the Scrambler is the customization that is possible. Some builders are making some pretty kickass bikes. Why make a CRF250L, or WR250R, rally/ADV build when you could do the same with a Scrambler. Steve MacQueen raced one back in the day.

That's not the King of Cool, unless he is back from the dead on a modern Scrambler.


From this

to

this




or this



I'm thinking, new exhaust, tires, seat, suspension, skid plate, foot pegs, GPS mounting bracket, some other odds and ends, maybe a custom paint job, viola........Fundy Adventure Rally bike. A British rally weapon. For sure CMG editor 'Arris, the man from Yorkshire, would fully agree. I'll change my name to Nigel, start drinking tea, and develop an uncanny British accent from the Liverpool area. Bloody nice.

You all have to agree, it would not be something you'd normally see being turned into a modern day rally bike?

Oh ya, just remembered, I was supposed to write about the CMG/Bigland off road Maritime trip. So sorry, it will have to wait til next time now.










Saturday, 15 November 2014

Three Wheeled Movie Fun, and Winter Arrives

I was at my daughters hockey game last night sitting with my friend Rod who also happens to be a biker, and runner, he just completed his first marathon and if it all goes well maybe we will be doing a 50 miler next year. Anyway, he said, the blog has been quiet, no new bikes?

 Of course, I have been stewing over a new blog entry, and I continue to lust after a new bike, because  one is never enough, and I have yet to find the perfect one, however the Vstrom is damn close. It does everything but trail ride, and get me through the winter. So my mind keeps coming back to the good ol' Russian three wheeler. The Ural.

So in my obsessive search for all knowledge on Russian sidecar motorbikes I stumbled upon a couple of good independent films. One I linked to a couple of months ago, Sit, Stay, Ride It's a documentary about two of my loves, sidecars, and dogs. It's one of the reasons I really want a sidecar, so I can take both the dogs with me. Share what you love to do with man's best friend. Plus with the two-wheeled drive option of a Ural, the recent snowfall wouldn't slow me down or stop me in my tracks. Turn up the heated jacket a notch and keep going.

I just downloaded this movie, and have yet to watch it, but the trailer looks really good. If you are a fan of bikes and dogs go to Vimeo and check it out.




Sit Stay Ride: The Story of America's Sidecar Dogs - Trailer from Ristau & Liimatta on Vimeo.


Yes Molly, you could be this cool

Molly and Abbie sharing a different kind of ride with me


I really think a new Ural will be in my not-to-distant future, spring of 2015. What's that mean for the 250 rally/ADV build? Not sure. However the Ural will make a great rally, off road film platform, sweep bike. Plus it will be perfect for our upcoming CMG/Bigland documentary on riding off road around New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. I have yet to tell anyone about that on the blog. That will be in the next update. But it's gonna be fun. A Newfie in Ural, and an Englishman on a KLR, and a bunch of maritimers on dirt, ADV bikes. What could go wrong?



Before I move on to the next film, I just want to say I do not have a drinking problem, in fact I rather enjoy it, and can pound back a few-to-many beers with no issue. Being a pilot and traveling the world, you get to frequent a lot of different bars while trying to kill time between flights. (we do have a 12hr bottle to throttle rule, so don't worry I'm not the guy Denzel Washington portrayed in Flight, I have yet to snort cocaine to get me ready to fly) So the idea of traveling on sidecar across a country checking out every cool bar along the way is an awesome idea. May even be a future documentary that will go well with my 50th birthday plans of riding around Ireland. 

I haven't watched this yet, but I am looking forward to it. It's not a documentary like Sit, Stay, Ride, but has that edgy, Easyriders feel to it. Might be a Saturday afternoon, lid down on the couch kinda movie.





The Best Bar in America - Trailer from The Best Bar in America on Vimeo.


A whiskey-fueled writing assignment takes one man on an epic motorcycle road trip through the bars and taverns across the American West. Riding a 1960 BMW R60/2 motorcycle with a sidecar, Sanders (Andrew Rizzo) is a down-on-his-luck writer on a mission to chronicle every watering hole along the way. With help of fellow traveler and dharma bum, Northway (David Ackroyd) and a variety of other colorful characters along the way, Sanders learns the way of the road and the zen of the bar.
Motorcycling the West, sleeping on the ground, chasing mermaids, and drinking in America's most legendary taverns, Sanders experiences firsthand the brotherhood of the bike and bar. Along the way, he gets advice from Ernest Hemingway and Jim Harrison on writing, drinking, and living life to the fullest. The Best Bar in America is a classic road movie for the modern age.

So yesterday we received our first real brush with winter.  Snow blanketed the ground, and my hopes of a late winter were crushed under the weight of a wet, ten centimetres of the white shit. The roads stayed bare for the most part, and I was once again hopeful that the salt trucks would stay parked, but alias as we drove home from my daughters hockey game the mercury had plummeted below freezing and a fresh coating of rock salt covered the road. The good news, rain and ten degrees on Wednesday, which should wash most of the evil, corrosive stuff off the road. The rest of the week will be cool with temps near freezing but I hope to still get some rides in.

 Yes, I could be tearing it up in the snow with the dogs, enjoying the winter beauty on the logging roads of New Brunswick.


All the summer toys put away for the winter. The long wait to live again begins.











Next update........I'll bring all of you up up to speed on the CMG/Bigland documentary planned for next year. It's gonna be dirty, fun, educational and enlightening.

Thursday, 30 October 2014

Rally Bike Build Part Deux

So how does the rally bike build for next year been shaping up. Well I have the type of bike narrowed down to two. I know initially it was to be the CRF250L, but my friend and Yamaha dealer, Tim Hovey mentioned that I would look even better on kitted out WR250R. Let's face it, it is all about looks.




The good part is, this project which will documented here on the blog, and videoed into a multi-part web series has gotten the green light from the grand poobah of Canadian motorcycle journalism himself, editor-at-large Rob Harris of Canada Moto Guide. So Rob is gonna work his magic on the vendors.

So which bike has the most hop up potential? The WR is pretty well suspended right from the factory, that is the CRF's downfall. That means an all new suspension set up for the CRF. Both require larger gas tanks, bar risers, new bars, hand guards, exhaust, header, FI remapping, tires, maybe wheels, foot-pegs, shift and brake levers, tail tidy kit, bash plate, foldable mirrors, soft luggage, new seat, chain and sprockets, and a good solid GPS mount with small fairing. Am I forgetting anything? Some cosmetic bling to make it look even cooler, of course.

The CRF needs more work, which would be better for web series, but the WR has more power stock. Stay tuned to see what happens next.


Yes folks this is a CRF250L

Yamaha's WR450F version. Turning a WR250R into this would be very cool as well. Compliments of Enduro21.com

YAMAHA WR450F RALLY BY REBEL X SPORTS

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YAMAHA WR450F RALLY BY REBEL X SPORTS
Developed by Rebel X Sport in conjunction with Yamaha Italy this Yamaha WR450F Rally bike can be yours for just 13.490 euro (£10,500, $17,200 approx) excluding tax!
Designed to be ‘a bike dedicated to big adventure and exploration but also ready to race’ the Yamaha WR450F Rally has been built to deliver affordable performance, reliability and simplicity. It’s also possible for those who already own a Yamaha WR450F to buy the Rally Kit separately at a retail price of 5.690 euro vat excl.
Here’s what the Rebel X Sports press release has to say about the Yamaha WR450F Rally…
A new Dakar-ready bike from Yamaha Italy, priced at 13.490 euro (£10,500, $17,200 approx.)
Today we are proud to present the Yamaha WR450F Rally in its final customer version at the incredible retail price of 13.490 euro (vat excl.).
The bike meets the Dakar regulations standards and so this gives the chance to any rider to have a machine ready to race Dakar and any other international rally without having to make any modifications.
Some of the main features of the WR450F Rally are a fuel tank capacity of almost 29 litres distributed in a homogeneous way through the 2 plastic tanks, which deliver autonomy of over 300km on offroad. A special bash plate has been designed with a water reserve, a water pump protector and a big toolbox in order to avoid having to wear a tool bag – favouring the position of the weights lower to the ground. The bike is equipped with full navigation system – an electric road book holder, a trip master and a handlebar command that let’s you adjust both navigational instruments.

Yamaha-WR450F-Rally-2015-5-1280
The navigation tower is developed with a new innovative patented frame bracket system, which excludes any modification and gives the chance to quickly and easily switch the bike from rally configuration to enduro. The whole tower can be dismounted simply by taking out two bolts. Furthermore the tower is machined from solid, this giving the structure a great resistance to impacts and it comes right away with Iritrack mount, fuse box, speedocap mount, second trip master mount and GPS/Iritrack Antennas support bracket.

The lights are LED with a power of 50 watt each, mounted inside a special plastic shell that removes light glare from the transparent Plexiglas fairing. The fairing is mounted on the tower and front fuel tank with six quick release buckles to make it extremely quick to mount/dismount without the need of any tools.
The exhaust system was developed with a long series of dyno tests in order to achieve a generally better performance both at high and low rpm and predispose the bike for rallies where generally average speed are much higher.

Yamaha-WR450F-Rally-2015-4-1280
For this reason together with the exhaust ECU has been re-mapped. Due to the higher speeds the brake system needed improvements so a 270mm oversize front wave brake disk is mounted together with a calliper support on which the trip master sensor is inserted.
One other important features comes from the electrical section where under the seat you can find a 14 Ah lithium battery which has a weight of only 700gr and grants enough power to keep all the navigations instruments turned on without fear of the battery running out. The navigation equipment has its own separate circuit going into the battery so if switching to enduro is simple and plug&play.

The WR450F Rally features graphics on the tanks and fairing made out of crystal to ensure maximum protection from scratches. Thanks to a special glue combined with little cuts on the stickers, these eliminate bubble formation from fuel evaporation.



Yamaha-WR450F-Rally-2015-6 1280
Ultimately people that want upgrades such as cush drive wheels, steering damper, higher seat and so on, there will be a series of options available with which you can customize the bike.
The Yamaha WR450F Rally can be purchased from today through the only exclusive distributor of this model, Rebel X Sports Srl.
For more info contact Yamaha Motor Italy or Rebel X Sports through their website www.rebelxsports.com, or email rebelxsports@gmail.com
Developing the Yamaha WR450F Rally by Rebel X Sports...
At the end of January a new rally prototype bike was presented by Yamaha Motor Italy at the Motor Bike Expo in Verona (Italy). The great consensus and appreciation from the public brought to the decision to develop a customer version to enable anyone to start dreaming about Dakar but also simply about exploring the desert and the unknown.
In May 2014 the Yamaha WR450F Rally made its debut on the race scene, as part of the testing process, at the Italian Baja Championship with the factory supported rider and 2012 Baja World Champion, Manuel Lucchese. The bike immediately made it on the top of the podium with an overall win, which helped also catch the Championship leadership but mostly demonstrating the potential of this model.

Yamaha-WR450F-Rally-2015-2-1280
The R&D went throughout a 12 months period since the start of the project in October 2013 with a key objective, to produce a rally bike that would be the most affordable on the market but also that would grant reliability and performance.
To achieve this the Italian rider Manuel Lucchese was hired to guide the engineers in the right direction since he has on his back 2 Dakar participations as a privateer and several years racing in the World Cross Country Rallies Championship.
The biggest challenge was to deliver a bike that without the need of upgrades could bring anyone to conquer the Dakar finish and subsequently any other rally without having to worry about the need of having particular mechanical knowledge and last but not least making the Yamaha WR450F Rally come out at an affordable and human price.

Yamaha-WR450F-Rally-2015-10-1280
- See more at: http://www.enduro21.com/index.php/component/k2/item/2216-yamaha-wr450f-rally-by-rebel-x-sports#sthash.ITNgvMfR.dpuf


Wednesday, 29 October 2014

What's New in The Dirty World of Two Wheels and the Grand Opening of Motorsport Plus

The cool nip of winter is in the air, and it's the season of the bike show. The major manufacturers have released all the details of the new 2015 models, and most riders cannot wait for spring already. Time for some new wheels.



I was attending the grand opening of Motorsport Plus today in Saint John, which is happening all week, so please drop in for a donut, coffee, buy a new sled, ATV or bike.  If you remember from a previous posting, MSP is the life long dream turned reality for my friend Tim Hovey. So being the nice guy I am, I dropped in to once again congratulate him, and for my own selfish reasons, to look at shiny new bikes, plus they had free coffee and donuts. While I sipped away on that free java, Tim and I discussed the newest, let's get dirty, offerings from Yamaha and Suzuki.

Let's kick it off with the newly designed WR250F, Yamaha's four-stroke enduro bike. So what's been changed from the old one, well the big change is fuel-injection, and from what I can gather ( I am not a real technical guy, more of a get on a go type of fella) the engine is now based around the current generation YZ motocross one, plus there are numerous cosmetic changes and the bike looks really kick-ass now.

Here is what Yamaha has to say:

We've taken our revolutionary YZ four stroke motocross technology and applied it to the enduro world. Rearward slanted engine, reversed cylinder, forward mounted fuel injection and a compact chassis are just some of the key features found on the new WR250F. Delivering light, agile handling on tight trails, the new WR with its excellent reliability record is also a great choice for the experienced recreational rider too.



The new bike is now really the little brother of the WR450R. If only Yamaha had made this street-legal like a KTM EXC,  I would then be in line to get one. My days of trailering bikes to to go ride is over. The good part.....MSRP $8799 CDN Pesos. Imagine if you could get this plated for the road at this price. 





What really surprised me this year was Team Blue's new YZ250FX. At first I thought it was gonna be some kind of stock freestyle MX bike, which would be weird, not sure there is a large market for that, or even a minute market. 

Harescrambles have become quite a popular form of racing in the last few years, and other than the offerings from the Orange side and a few select Euro manufacturers there really isn't a true dedicated HS bike offered by the Japanese....until now. I have to say I did not see this coming, and it's refreshing to see this. Oh and yes folks it comes with both a kickstart and an e-start, all for the low price of $8749.00




The high flying, high paced action of motocross is not for everyone. As a result, the slightly less intense world of cross country / harescramble racing is experiencing solid growth and interest. Yamaha is pleased to announce the YZ250FX, a cross country focused model with the performance potential of the YZ250F. If you are serious about winning, the new YZ250FX could be the machine for you.










Suzuki doesn't have much to announce other than their new Vstrom 650. Well, when I say new, I mean new styling, essentially the bike remains unchanged other than wire wheels, the new beak, and long name.....Suzuki VStrom 650X ABS EXP. The EXP comes with some addition goodies, luggage, crash bars, skid plate, hand guards, etc. Pretty much roll out of the showroom and head around the world on your next adventure. It does come with a price tag of $11,399 though. You can still buy a standard, no frills 650 for $8999.




I was hoping Suzuki would revamp there dual sports. Since they were designed back in the 80's, and they are getting long in the tooth. I don't imagine sales of DRZ's and DR's are very big anymore. Fuel-injection anyone??? Maybe some modern styling. Jeez, not too much to ask for.

I'd also like to see Honda come out with a CRF650L too. 

So why all the dirty bikes, well there may just be a documentary in the works for next year.......trails, dual purpose bikes and a week of dusty, muddy, rocky, sandy travel. That's all I'm divulging yet.



Friday, 17 October 2014

URAL I Want, No AIMExpo for Me and Motosport Plus

Yes, it's that time of the month again, for what bike does Terry want now. Not much has changed, I am still lusting after a Ural. Time for some three-wheeled fun I think.

To me it's the ultimate adventure bike. Two-wheeled drive, go anywhere, year round, kick ass, take your kids, wife, dog(s), and look really cool while doing it, machine. Plus, it's such a basic machine, with 1930's technology, that it's easy to wrench on. Which is important for someone with limited mechanical skills, like myself.

I have read all the horror stories in ADVRider.com on how unreliable they are, however almost every bike on ADVRider has horror stories. I'm surprised anyone buys BMW 1200's for fear of final-drive failure. The true Uralist's rave about them, and yes they do require more routine maintenance than say a Honda, with shorter oil-change and valve check intervals, but that's not the end of the world. I would also like to become more mechanically savvy, so having to work on a bike a little more is something I look forward to. Plus if I really mess up I have a friend who owns a bike shop with real mechanics to bail me out. More on that later.

I am looking at a Ural Patrol, most likely a 2013 model, as they are a little cheaper in price, unless I can come across a well priced 2014. Ural updated the whole line this year, and came out with fuel-injection, triple disc brakes (rear drums on the previous models) and an upgraded steering damper. All the things I would like to have, but the price tag is over $20K with tax. A new 2013 can be had for $17K tax in.

It's a lot of money for a bike designed by BMW in the 1930's, however it's the only one designed to be used with a sidecar, and the only one with two-wheeled drive. I'd also ride it all year round. They go great through the snow. What about the dreaded salt covered roads? I'd have it undercoated, and use liberal amounts of rust inhibitor spray throughout the winter. Plus my garage is not heated.

There's a group of Uralists in Maine and New Hampshire that ride all year with no issue and they deal with road salt all the time.

Anyone interested in 2006 Vstrom 1000 with 26000 miles on it?


I was supposed to be reporting to you from the Orange County Convention Center in sunny Orlando again this year, however work plans changed. 

Last year I was in Orlando for my yearly flight simulator training, and was able to take in the Expo compliments of CMG and their press passes for the show. I was once again sked for training at the same time, and was going to go early and take in the show before it opened to the public, do the real Joe Reporter thing. I was pretty stoked, Ducati and Kawasaki where attending this year too.

About a month ago the boss changed my sked. They needed one of the senior guys for a week long overseas trip, so it was given to yours truly. Nice to be needed. Now a week in Europe is not a bad thing either, but no demo rides or shiny new bikes to lust after for Terry.





Remember that friend of mine with a bike shop? If you are familiar with Saint John, New Brunswick, you'll know that Maclean's Powersport has been a fixture on Rothesay Avenue for a lot of years. It was by no means the best bike shop around. It was a dark, bland, I'd almost say junky kind of spot where the employees were unmotivated. The had a great location and building, but it was lifeless.

Well that's all changed, thanks to new owner Tim Hovey who bought Maclean's and has renamed it Motosport Plus. Tim was with another dealer selling Harley Davidson's for years, and was most recently sales manager for one of the big car dealers in town before making his dream of owning a bike shop a reality. You will not find a nicer guy wanting to sell you the latest recreational toy.




Tim has since hired some new, very experienced staff, and is in the middle of remodelling the shop. The place looks a lot brighter and more organized, and the staff seem stoked about the new changes.

They are currently a dealer for Yamaha, Suzuki, and Arctic Cat, but there are hints of some possible additional brands. Hint, hint, maybe Ural Tim? I'll help you sell them.

Of course their grand opening is next week, while I am overseas. If you are in the area stop in say hi, and checkout what they have to offer. I will be doing a more thorough write-up and interview with Tim later on.

I wish Tim, his family and all the staff the best of luck with Motosport Plus. I'm sure it will become one of Saint John's top recreational motorsports retailers.